Blind Date, A Comeback in Modern Chinese Life

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China Focus: Chinese flee from pushy parental matchmaking

In the following 4 chapters, you will quickly find the 24 most important statistics relating to “Online dating and matchmaking in China”. The most important key figures provide you with a compact summary of the topic of “Online dating and matchmaking in China” and take you straight to the corresponding statistics. Single Accounts Corporate Solutions Universities.

Popular Statistics Topics Markets. Published by Lai Lin Thomala , Mar 13, In fact, family is a very important concept in Chinese culture, and marriage is regarded as the most significant milestone of adulthood.

The gender imbalance has given rise to dating, matchmaking, and relationship counseling services. The annual revenue of China’s online.

The explosion of online dating apps is failing to dent the popularity of traditional “marriage markets” in China, with a distinct generation gap opening up on whether the digital world can be trusted for matchmaking. The informally organised markets usually take place on weekends in the parks of major cities, with information notices for singles detailing their age, height, job and personality traits.

The parents are worried”, he said, as he waited to speak to people browsing a notice for his year-old daughter. Like Mr Wang, most people at the market were middle-aged or elderly parents posting notices on behalf of their single children, often without their knowledge. Weekend marriage markets can be found all over China, but Shenzhen has the distinction of being China’s largest migrant city — with much of the 20 million population moving to the special economic zone in recent decades.

It’s a magnet for young workers across China’s southern provinces, in a country where more than a quarter of the labour force moves for a job. That focus on work opportunities and career means the marriage age is higher in Shenzhen than in most other large cities in China Mr Wang believes China lacks a “flirting culture”, making dating apps like his particularly suitable for the Chinese market.

Mr Wang attributes China’s more reserved dating culture to a lack of house parties and bar hopping among young people compared to the West. While there are around million user accounts for Tantan, the company has had to close another 50 million that were fake or used by scammers. Among the scams common in China’s online world are women who insist on a digital cash payment before they agree to meet, and those who take their dates to specific restaurants, only to order, flee and leave the man facing a highly inflated bill.

It’s these stories that help convince advocates of marriage markets that the online world is too risky a place to find true love. But one young woman browsing the notices at Shenzhen seemed to sum up the generational gap.

Matchmaking and marriage in modern China

The formation of Matchmaking Corner in China emerged in a complex context that combines Chinese pragmatism, Chinese traditional ethic, and the loneliness of the old. After briefly outlining how the process works, I will highlight the arrangement of the xiangqin the resultant meeting of prospective spouses. I then examine the criterion for marriage in the context of traditional views on marriage and an examination of the idea of marriage perceived as a social contract between two families, not as matters for the individual.

In China, Matchmaking Corner is full of elderly parents and organized by elderly parents themselves. It always takes place in the part with the most pedestrian volume in parks, which provides them a free platform to seeking a suitable spouse for their children.

In Shanghai, where singles are aplenty and birth rates are low, parents have taken to matchmaking expos to find their kids a lover.

Many people in China who want to get married are having trouble finding a partner. The country’s decades-long one-child policy led to the country having more young men than women, and their growing prosperity is making them pickier. The fate of eight young men will be decided today inside a cool, neon-lit shopping centre in Hangzhou, its facade emblazoned with a sign for “Intimate City”.

On their first day of the course, the men fan out in different directions, wearing ironed shirts and gelled hair. Some hook their thumbs into the loops of their jeans, strutting around like peacocks as they try to impress women. Dr Love, their coach at the seminar on flirting, taught them how. Yang Jing, left, searches for potential candidates to add to the database of Diamond Love, a matchmaking service. Gilles Sabrie.

Love and Money by Parental Matchmaking: Evidence from Urban Couples in China

Nearly half of the country’s million unmarried people are expected to use online dating platforms by as young and independent singles are successfully using apps to find a romantic match. Known as “matching windows and doors”, Chinese parents have played the role of matchmaker for generations, pairing up their children based on personality traits, occupations and socioeconomic class.

While these practices still exist, China’s increasingly independent young people are now in favour of a more empowering digital solution. One such example is Baihe, a dating platform that digitises the more traditional aspects of courtship in China. While other online dating platforms — such as the industry leader Momo — are designed for more casual dating, Baihe provides a platform to find a potential spouse.

The personal data supplied by users — including real names, qualifications, occupation, property ownership information and credit scores — is used to find a good romantic match.

are resorting to classes, matchmaking agencies and ‘love markets’ to get married in China “My parents met in our village, their families were close friends.

In China, women are often still seen as a commodity, a product that begins to lose value after turning 24, the average age of marriages there. She has been living in Shanghai for several years, and here, as in many other big cities, women who are well-educated and earn good salaries can have a hard time finding somebody. Out of this social climate, a multimillion-dollar industry has emerged that exploits the fears and loneliness of a generation.

Eric, the president of the Weime Club, has been teaching classes like this for more than 10 years. At first, they focused exclusively on male clients, but they have been shifting toward a female audience. At the end of the afternoon he chooses two students to take for hands-on training. The students were told to pretend they had run out of battery life on their phones and to approach men, asking for a photograph. Over the last few years, more and more such companies have cropped up in the ever-expanding Chinese cities.

Diamond Love, a matchmaking agency in Shanghai, caters to extremely rich clients. Tian Li was a successful IT executive but suffered from the loneliness that plagues many young men and women in China. The hope is that it will intrigue the women she is looking for, making them stop and listen for more. Today she has come with her team to a hip shopping district near Xintiandi. Judy scouts the streets and shops, searching for a girl who might fit the profile: she must be young, tall, beautiful and have white skin.

China’s youth turns to dating apps but their parents still post them in the local marriage markets

Larisa Epatko Larisa Epatko. The parents chat with each other about the attributes they — or rather, their children — are looking for in a mate. This phenomenon developed organically more than a decade ago in Shanghai and has since sprung up in other parts of China, said Zhen Trudy Wang, a former Caijing magazine reporter in Shanghai who now works for a public relations firm.

People were meeting at the park anyway to practice dancing, badminton and martial arts. Parents talk, and the matchmaking arose naturally.

In feudal China, men had liberty to divorce their wives for reasons ranging from Only marriages with parents’ consent and matchmaking were regarded as.

This photo taken on Dec. Zhu Fang’s living room walls are plastered with hundreds of headshots of hopeful singles, some of them faded and featuring bouffant hairstyles and outdated outfits. For almost 50 years he has been one of Beijing’s most popular matchmakers, and even now — aged 75 — he remains in as much demand as ever. Marriage, which has traditionally been key in the patriarchal society, is in decline and the country’s birth rate fell to its lowest level in 70 years in But Zhu insists people are still looking for love, and his phone rings often with matchmaking requests.

On a cold December morning, his from-home “office” is full of middle-aged parents huddling around binders of printed dating profiles, searching for a suitable son- or daughter-in-law. Zhu’s matchmaking career has spanned decades of breakneck economic growth and social change in China. When he first started out, China had not yet opened its economy to the rest of the world, and most of his clients were male factory workers.

A few colleagues at his sandblasting factory in Beijing had approached Zhu to ask if he could introduce them to potential girlfriends. After a few successful matches, Zhu was hooked. I thought that as long as I could find someone to pass the days with it would be fine. He says that in recent years his clients have become more status-conscious and are often embarrassed about using a matchmaker. But he admits that he can’t find a partner for everyone, and “some photos have been up for a long time”.

There’s also a growing trend for intimacy on-demand, with some people opting for virtual boyfriends and girlfriends, so they can still have companionship without the pressures and commitments of real life dating.

Finding the other half: How Chinese parents are matchmaking

But the Chinese young people now have “ever growing needs” and one of those needs is the need to avoid this kind of arranged marriage and choose their own partner. Happiness cannot be found through formulaic descriptions on A4 paper, occasionally laminated. At matchmaking corners in parks, parents usually display a resume of their child, listing education, birth date, salary, job, housing and any details that might “help” their child. Permanent residence or a house in a major city, overseas education or a car are seen as selling points and parents of such well-endowed candidates are much pickier.

The practice of matchmaking in this avenue is called BaiFaXiangQin and despite the wide acceptance of parental matchmaking in Chinese culture, parents often.

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Women are resorting to classes, matchmaking agencies and ‘love markets’ to get married in China

According to Thepaper. The truth is, even if we tried to register such an event, our request could be easily turned down. Xiao is not alone in this cause. Ever since the Chinese Society of Psychiatry declassified homosexuality as a mental disorder in , parents, activists and experts have been trying to promote the legalization of gay marriage in the country.

Parents talk, and the matchmaking arose naturally. “Matchmaking” is actually a more accurate term than “market,” which implies that money is.

In ancient China most of people got married with the help of a matchmaker and the arrangements of their parents. The man’s side, led by the matchmaker, would visit the girl’s family to confirm each other’s stance. The step is called xiangqin to confirm attitudes. Nowadays, there are millions of single people in big cities like Shanghai and Beijing, so the traditional practice of xiangqin, with more than 1, years of history behind it, has made a comeback in modern Chinese life.

Hundreds of parents of white-collar children gather together to choose suitable objects for their children’s marriage in parks such as Zhongshan Park, and Zi Zhu Yuan Park in Beijing, since the end of They bring information, including their child’s name, gender, profession and requirements of marriage, and play the role of matchmaker. It naturally develops as a “meeting to choose the best person for their children’s marriage. Every Thursday and Sunday, a man named Zhang goes to Zhongshan Park to choose a suitable partner for his daughter.

Now he is familiar with persons there. In fact, it is useless. Most of the children even do not see the pictures brought back by parents. Chen Tao, a year-old IT professional, thinks that it is his private business to find a mate.

China’s Unmarried “Leftover Women”


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